PALYNOMORPHS IN DUNG, A KEY TO DIET, THE ENVIRONMENT AND EVOLUTION.


The presence of palynomorphs in feces has been noted for samples of Paleozoic to Recent age. Recently, particularly through the work of Prof. Jose Carrión, these studies have been shown to provided unique information on paleo-environments in addition to paleo-diet. Other studies have shown the value of palynomorphs in tracing insect migration and habitat preference. In the rock stratigraphic record, palynomorphs in feces provide the earliest records of arthropod-plant commensalism.

This "Faeces Facies Symposium" will be held at the joint meeting of BMS, NAMS and AASP, ULC September 11-13, 2002, University College, London, England.
www.ucl.ac.uk/UCL-Info/AboutUCL/information.html. Abstract, Registration, and Fieldtrip Forms, and Meeting Information can be found in the March, 2002, AASP Newsletter: (35)1: 19-22.

  • Abstracts were due May 31, 2002
  • Registration deadline is Friday, July 26, 2002
  • Tentative Schedule
  • SYMPOSIUM ORGANIZERS:

    PARTICIPANTS:
    1. Vaughn Bryant & Glenna Dean, vbryant@neo.tamu.edu
      Title: Eric O. Callen and the Early Years of Coprolite Analysis Abstract
    2. Owen Davis, Univ. Ariz. USA palynolo@geo.arizona.edu
      Title: Fungal spores from coprolites, a means of detecting herbivore density. Abstract
    3. Glenna Dean, GDean@lvr.state.nm.us
      Title: The Science of Coprolite Analysis: The View from Hinds Cave Abstract
    4. James Dickson, Peta Mudie, & Richard Hebda, mailto:gbty08@udcf.gla.ac.uk
      Title:Analysing the Intestinal Contents of Ancient Icemen (Ötzi and Long Ago Person Found): Revealing Itineraries and Domiciles Abstract
    5. Jean Nicolas Haas, Univ. Innsbruck-Austria, Jean-Nicolas.Haas@uibk.ac.at
      Title: Did sheep/goat eat up the Neolithic forest? - Palynology of sheep/goat faeces from prehistoric pile-dwellings of Switzerland. Abstract
    6. Kate Habgood kate.habgood@praxis-cs.co.uk
      Title: The origin of Lower Devonian spore-rich coprolites. Abstract
    7. Conrad Labandeira, Smithson, USA labandeira.conrad@nmnh.si.edu
      Title: Fossil Insect Palynivory and Pollination: Role of Plant Damage, Coprolites, and Gut Contents. Abstract
    8. Suzanne Leroy, Brunel Univ. UK suzanne.leroy@brunel.ac.uk
      Title: Palynological analysis of a 2,000 year-old bat-guano deposit in Wales (UK) Abstract
    9. Lou Maher, Univ. Wisc., USA maher@geology.wisc.edu
      Title: Environmental Information from the Palynology of Bat Guano Abstract
    10. Jock McAndrews, Univ. Toronto, CA jock.mcandrews@utoronto.ca
      Title: Fossil pollen grains in the digesta of mice and mastodonts Abstract
    11. Sérgio Miranda, ENSP, RJ, Brasil smiranda@ensp.fiocruz.br
      Title: Contribution of the palynology of coprolithes to knowledge on diseases and the pharmacopoeia of prehistoric men of Paleoindians people from North-East, Brazil - Piaui Abstract
    12. Riker Yll, Ramon Pérez-Obiol, & J.A. Alcover errikartaimanol.yll@uab.es
      Title: Palynological Analysis Of Myotragus balearicus Coprolites. The Extinction Of Animal And Vegetal Species During The Holocene in The Balearic Islands (Spain). Abstract
    13. Karl Reinhard, Univ. Nebr., USA., kreinhard1@unl.edu
      Title:Plant DNA in Prehistoric Coprolites: Evidence of Diet or Contamination? Abstract
    14. Linda Scott Cummings, Golden, USA lscummings@attbi.com
      Title: Through the Microscope: A Look at Early and Late Christian Diet in Nubia Abstract

    BMS http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosted_sites/bms/paly.htm
    NAMS http://www.ig.utexas.edu/nams/nams.html
    AASP http://www.palynology.org/
    Conference organizer:
    James Powell ajp@dinosystems.co.uk

    Pollen-rich feces - has anyone else seen them in Holocene samples?