Andrew Cohen ⎮ Implications of African Paleoclimates for Human History

The Laboratory of Paleolimnology at the University of Arizona is leading a $10 million dollar investigation, involving over 50 scientists from 8 countries, using sediment drill cores from lake deposits to understand the paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic context of human origins. Through the collection of specifically targeted drill cores from ancient lake deposits in Kenya and Ethiopia we hope to transform our understanding of how environmental change and variabilitiy may have impacted the evolution, diversification and extinction of our ancestors and near relatives.  Details about this project can be found at our project Facebook page (see  Hominin Sites and Paleolakes Drilling Project-HSPDP), the HSPDP project website (http://hspdp.asu.edu) or the International Continental Drilling Program Site (http://www.icdp-online.org/front_content.php?idcat=1225) for more information. For recent publications describing the project goals and to provide background also see in my bibliography (Cohen et al., 2008, 2009, Committee on the Earth System Context for Human Evolution, 2011 and Blome et al., 2012; Cohen publications #86,87,90 and 103).

Drilling Pliocene lake beds at the Tugen Hills, Central Kenya site, June 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

A.Drilling Pliocene lake beds at the Tugen Hills, Central Kenya site, June 2013. Photo by Andy Cohen.
 

HSPDP team scientists Anders Noren (U. Minnesota-left) and John Kingston (U. Michigan-right) wrapping and labeling core at the Tugen Hills, Kenya site. June, 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

B. HSPDP team scientists Anders Noren (U. Minnesota-left) and John Kingston (U. Michigan-right) wrapping and labeling core at the Tugen Hills, Kenya site. June, 2013. Photo by Andy Cohen.

The West Turkana Drill Site, with Lake Turkana and North Island in the background. This site was drilled to collect early Pleistocene lake beds near important fossil hominin and archaeological sites of northern Kenya.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C. The West Turkana Drill Site, with Lake Turkana and North Island in the background. This site was drilled to collect early Pleistocene lake beds near important fossil hominin and archaeological sites of northern Kenya. Photo by Andy Cohen

Graduate students Chad Yost (U. Arizona) and Leslie Dullo (U. Nairobi) operating the field Multisensor Core Logger in our field laboratory at the West Turkana site, June, 2013.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

D. Graduate students Chad Yost (U. Arizona) and Leslie Dullo (U. Nairobi) operating the field Multisensor Core Logger in our field laboratory at the West Turkana site, June, 2013. Photo by Andy Cohen.