The Hawaiian Islands are the most recent emergent islands along the Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot track. The islands are a gigantic pile of basaltic rocks erupted over the last ~4 Ma. Older islands in the chain, like Kauai are now inactive and have mostly fallen back into the ocean via giant landslides. Above is a topographic/bathymmetric map of the islands. Islands from right to left: Ni'ihau, Hauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Kahoolawe, Maui, Hawaii. Clearly visible are underwater landslide areas.
Map: http://dvl.sdsc.edu/chromadepth/gallery/
The big island of Hawaii is only about 1 Ma old and is the most active of all the islands--therefore it is a prime destination for a geologic field trip. The big island has six volcanic centers that get older to the northwest part of the island. The youngest, Loihi is a seamount off the southern coast of the big island. Kilauea is a very active vent on the flanks of Mauna Loa, which is the youngest shield-stage volcano on the island. Mauna Kea is the other large shield volcano, but is much less active. On the flanks of Mauna Kea on the western side of the island is Hualalai. The least active volcano on the island is Kohala on the northwest corner of the island.
Map: http://bestofhawaii.com/map_bigi.htm